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had the responsibility of trying to raise two young sons on her own, and in a city of detroit, inner city boston, and then back to detroit, after she got her footing. and that was very difficult. she only had a third agreed education. she worked very hard as a domestic. leaving at 5:00 in the morning north getting home until after midnight, going from job to job to job. she just had a disdain for welfare. and the sense that she was very observant and she noticed that no one she ever saw go on it came up a of it, and she just didn't like the idea of being dependent her whole life. so she figured she would work as long and as hard as she needed to, and that somehow god would take care of her. and i was an awful student, and -- but i just loved the whole concept of medicine. anytime there was story on television or the radio about medicine, i was right there. i just loved hearing about the story. interestingly enough, a lot of the big medical breakthroughs when i was a little kid seemed to be coming out of johns hopkins so i internalized one day i wanted to work at johns hopkins. but i
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at the rise of twit we are the company's co-founder in just a couple minutes. >>> plus, is the detroit bankruptcy just the beginning? we'll take a look at state and local governments to see who might be the next bankruptcy and where it might be coming. is your city next? >>> first up, as we told you a few moments ago, the president cancelling a summit with vl vladimir putin over the treatment of edward snowden. eamon javers is live in washington with the latest. >> carl, just within the past few minutes or so, the white house has put out a statement saying that the president now that he's got some time to kill while he's over in europe is going to visit sweden which the white house calls a close friend and partner and obvious jab at russia. the white house saying this morning that the president is not going to participate in this planned summit with vladimir putin, the russian president. he is, however, going to go to the g-20, that's in st. petersburg, russia. he's not going to have that moscow meeting with put putin, however. among the reasons was the decision to give edward snowden
had the responsibility of trying to raise two younger sons on her own, in this city of detroit, later inner-city boston and back to detroit after she got her footing and that was very difficult. she only had a third grade education. she worked very hard at cleaning people's houses, leaning at 5:00 in the morning, usually not getting back before midnight going from job to job job. for some reason she had the same for welfare in the sense that she was very observant and noticed that no one she ever saw go on it came off of it and she didn't like the idea of being dependent her whole life so she figured she would work as long and as hard as she needed to and somehow god would take care of her. i was an awful students, but i loved the concept of medicine. any time there was a story on television or radio about medicine i loved hearing about the story. interestingly enough the big medical breakthroughs seemed to come out of johns hopkins. i even internalized as a little kid the one day i wanted to work at johns hopkins. i told my mother wanted to be a doctor. gee think i could be a doctor?
for military benefits, health care, housing, and ten days of marriage leave. >>> a detroit police chief is apologizing after accidently sending out the bra sizes of some female police officers. he says the information was used for measuring bullet proof vests and was an unfortunate clerical error and not done maliciously. >>> the group of powerball winners from oceans county, new jersey, have claimed their share of that jackpot. each will get about $3.8 million after taxes. got to have that hat on, too, when you claim it, right? >>> more and more celebrities are turning to surrogacy in order to become parents. a study released this week by the centers of disease control show infertility rates have not changed in the last 20 years, still affecting 1 in 6 couples. surrogacy has helped people like jimmy fallon live their dream of becoming parents. >> announcer: early today health brought by vagisil. >>> okay, now to business. >> richard, apple stock had its second best day of the year, up 5% after carl icon tweeted he's bought a sizable stake in the iphone maker. i con says he had a friend
of art in the city in terms of what they are worth. it's a tough time for detroit. >>> time for a look ahead and a look back. the 67th little league world series starts today. >> i'll watch. >> bill probably played in that. >> no, debit maidn't make it. >> they'll begin facing nauf williamsport, pennsylvania. >>> in 1969, the start of woodstock. the four-day music festival brought almost 500,000 people to upstate new york. >>> happy birthday to jennifer lawrence. carl edwards turns 34 and actor/director ben affleck is 41. >>> here's what's coming up on the "today" show. a sneak peek of cory monteith's final movie before his death. >>> and the one and only jimmy buffett performs some of his biggest hits live on the plaza. >>> keep it right here for more news, weather and sports. i'm richard lui along with bill karins. thanks for watching "early today." have a great thursday. . >>> troops are out in force in egypt this morning, tensions running high as clashes between the military and protesters don't appear to end any time soon. >> involved in a deadly shooting overnight. we'll let you
and state backed plan to demolish abandoned homes in detroit. now thousands of vacant homes in the bankrupt city will be torn down in the next eight months. the governor said a lot of these empty builds attract crime and contribute 60% to fire. it will be the biggest elimination projects in michigan state history. >>> breaking news out of iraq where a series of bomb attacks has killed 16 police and medical sources. we'll bring you more on that shortly. that will do it for this edition of al jazeera news. please fill free to follow us at www.aljazeera.com, and we'll bring you the latest information on that breaking story. until then we'll see you at 4:00.
that economic justice required political power. in the two months before the march when king spoke in detroit before a crowd of 150,000, he reminded them there in his version of the "i have a dream" speech in detroit that it was time for blacks to have access to housing and jobs. >> let me get you to pause one second as we watch the president and the first lady now desce descending the stairs. this will be followed by the star-spangled banner performance. you see the president there. his remarks are scheduled around 2:44 p.m. eastern time. it is now 2:12 eastern time. you hear the applause there. professor, again, chris made the point about the president needing to address some of these current issues. double-digit unemployment rate for african-americans and to equate it to what we experienced then and sadly the numbers that exist today. >> no, it's a great point. i mean, again, when barack obama was elected president, it was important for many african-americans to see him as a realization of that political power. for many, he realized that vision -- >> let me pause you as we listen to the na
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
, responsibility. not just some. >> you know, lee, in detroit where they just filed bankruptcy, they are actually talking about messing with people's pension. that the autobillionaires companies got bailed out and they're talking about taking workers pensions. and people want to know why we're marching? >> the retirees pensions in detroit average $19,000 a year. yet they want to attack the workers, they want to attack retirees. we've got to say no. we are not going to let that happen. they are using workers as scapegoats. that's one of the reasons we're out here tomorrow and we're going to be here until we're able to fight successfully for workers rights all over this country. it is a shame that folks would go after a retiree who makes $19,000 a year expecting they can sacrifice more. we've got to say no to that, al. all of us. our communities, our coalition partners, labor unions. we've got to say that's unacceptable in the richest country on the face of the earth. >> dennis, the speech we all remember was "i have a dream." but the person who called this march 50 years ago was a labor leader nam
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
on washington. first, edith lee payne of detroit tells the story of one of the iconic pictures taken at the event. >> one evening in october of 2008, i got a phoneical from my cousin, marcia, who lives in baltimore mo, maryland, she had been browgz a category with some friend and came across a 2009 black history calendar. on the front of this calendar were pictures of dr. king, and frederic douglas, jesse owens. and on the back of the calendar were these same people but, also, there was a picture of me. i of course immediately recalled being at the march on washington but i didn't recall a picture being taken. it also happened to be my 12th birthday. that day in washington was a very hot day. but it was a day where a lot of people from all over the country came together for a common goal, and that was to make the quality of life better for everyone. it was very special to me to be there, to be one of the people present to make a difference in what dr. king had brought to our attention. >> woodruff: that was edith lee payne of detroit. you can find her story, and other firsthand accou
discourages new capital from coming in. if you don't know, think of detroit. would you lend to detroit today? you wouldn't. you would want to find out what happens to others who lend to detroit. there is the longer-term agenda. that has to do with potential growth. that speaks to education. it speaks to some micro things that we should be doing. one of the problems of the fed being the center of attention is it diverts discussion away from other things. there is this whole set of other things that are more important for us and for the next generation, that this whole narrative have shifted away from. >> as chief of the white house global council of economics, what types of new projects are you working on? >> you have promoted me. [laughter] i am grateful to be chair of the council on global development. the notion is very simple. part of securing u.s. national security and economic future and living in a global neighborhood that is more prosperous. it has had numerous advantages. the idea is to contribute and bring in outside perception. we are a council made of people from very different ba
history moved deeper into the yosemite national park. >>> the city of detroit getting a makeover. the state plans to demolish nearly 4,000 abandoned homes to remove urban blight. >>> and health officials in texas working to contain a measles outbreak linked to a so-called mega church. i'm john siegenthaler. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome b
is focusing on detroit. a city that is gone through incredible pain. and this is an opportunity for those of us who believe this is the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it's a city where we which party has run that city for the past 50 years and we can propose different solutions, solutions . sed on our free enterprise strongly encouraging enterprise zones in detroit but we need ideas. anyone want to talk to us about detroit, that's where we think is one of the most important places to have an impact and to share in the cause that each of us believe. it's an honor to be with you all to share some words. i appreciate the opportunity. and god bless you. god bless america. thank you. >> thank you. now we will hear from mr. bob woodson sr., founder and president for the center of america.integrated >> good afternoon. the dr. king i remember was a man who was not content with reflecting the majority opinion or the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was
detroit and birmingham county. those are not priorities. >> what should the white house do. what would dr. king say to barack obama today? >> he would be delighted that we have in him, president obama, the crown jewel of our struggle. he that done an incredible job making the case for a better nation. on the other hand, president obama would be in the asks i say, in the johnson lincoln lane, dr. king in the douglas lane appealing to the president. i think they need president obama to deem with the lyndon johnson moment. he gave us solid analysis, and appropriation and legislation. we need now, 30% black unemployment, we need appropriation and legislation to close these tremendous gaps. >> reverend jackson, we go back many years, thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you, sir. >> i hope you enjoy your day down on the mall. >> indeed. >> coverage continues today on aljazeera and aljazeera.com. we will have special coverage from the lincoln memorial at 2:00 eastern time. >> we turn now to the weather situation across the country, where they are wondering what it is going to be like
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
detroit worked and experience all of its own. but there's been a marriage between the civil rights movement and the social justice movement for a long time. and as we come to this 50th anniversary, i can recall watching mr. randolph, and certainly dr. king, in that sort of electrifying speech that was given that day, and i want to go back something myrlie said earlier, and that is the movement, i mean the media has really played with our mind for a long time. you know, the most exciting part of dr. king's speech and when te that gave folks so much energy was when he talked about his dream, both for himself, his people and the nation as a whole. but dr. king said some stuff before he got to that part of the speech. that you very seldom hear folks talk about. he was just talking about we came to washington, d.c. you know, which was in a sense of promissory note written by the founders of the nation that spoke to the fact that we were entitled to some stuff. life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness. and when i heard the speech, i was a young leader, a local unit of about 5000 folks. i
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
you think martin luther king would be saying about what has unfolded in detroit? >> well, i think obviously he would be very concerned. he would be outraged today that in america, black youth unemployment is close to 40% and real unemployment in this country is 14%. he talked about and led and moved toward that march on washington, that poor people's march at the time that he died, what he was talking about is an economy of full employment. massive investment in job creation and not just for african-americans. he was bringing together hispanics, poor whites and he was saying we have got to stand together and too often, ed, we forget about that aspect about martin luther king jr. and we simply focus on his enormously effective work in desegregating america. >> that day, what was the mood like? if you have to capture the emotion and memory about what that day was like, what would you say? >> enormous optimism, enormous excitement about the fact that so many people of all colors, of all ages came together in washington, d.c. that was unprecedented up until that point. the king speech
-old student was hit in the arm. he was taken to the hospital, treat, and relieved. >>> trouble for the detroit p.d. a police commander accidentally included female officers height, weight, and bra sizeses when he e-mailed out information involving bullet proof vest orders and it went to the whole department. the assistant police chief calls the incident unfortunate and embarrassing. >>> have you seen this viral video? this one from space. this was recently posted a video of her washing her hair on youtube and didn't take long for it to take off, pardon the pun! and she talked about it on the "today" show. >> i was amazed how many people asked me how i wash my hair. i guess it is unusual. many women in the past flown on short did your rigs and long duration commission and it is fascinating for folks so i thought i would answer that question by showing. >> she uses dry shampoo and a little bit of water that gets recycled back into the space station's processing system. >>> cnbc kayla is here with what is moving your money. kayla, this is a decision with a big impact on flyer's bottom line? >> it
are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for the intervention in iraq. said it leads to a moral and spiritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. of theeaming constitutional right to vote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over gills. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. to restoreng foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. graduations and los feliz. keep the faith. keep hope alive though. -- keep hope alive. the lord is our life. >> ♪ >> our next speaker is is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar christiann, and the product company. >> we must stand an hour ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am honored to be here today. for the last 88 years,
and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroit speech and then the speech in washington. >> i think one of the things to remember about dr. king, he was always operating on multiple levels in the context of the speech. he had just visited the university of virginia, only about three months before the march on washington 15 years ago where he was given a very academic speech and really spoke from the professor voice and academic voice about philosophy. remember, the university of virginia is mr. jefferson's university. it is the president, the founder who wrote that bad check, who wrote of course that extraordinary founding document that said we take it as self evident that all people are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and if if there was any self evidence on the mountain in 1776 than the fundamental human equality and so we see in king drawing on his ak sem i can self and a moment of african-american american woman dom preacher dom and the great historic document. >> we talk about the historic speeches and you can see tens of thousands get
. detroit birmingham bankruptcy. we're still paying an awful price for iraq. too much war, too little social uplift. ratings as killed, his went down. his status went up. so keep dreaming of the constitutional right to vote, stop the madness in north carolina and texas. keep dreaming. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. to go from sovereign thrift to sovereign employ, education, housed, choose schools over jails. keep dreaming. student loan debt forgiveness. keep dreaming. revise the u.s. civil rights commission. keep dreaming. restore foreclosed housing. keep dreaming. immigration reform that includes africa, haiti and the cribions. keep dreaming. 50 years later we are free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. and more graduation. and so keep the faith. and through it all keep lives. the lord is our light. >> our next speaker is attorney patricia rhodes, president national bar association, president of the washington bar association, legal funding, and the christian product company. >> we must stand our grounds for justice. we must stand our grounds for justice. on beha
. homeowners are locked up. insurance companies are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for he intervention in iraq. he said it leads to a moral and piritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. keep dreaming of the constitutional right to ote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over jails. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. keep dreaming to restore foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. more graduations and less funerals. keep the faith. keep hope alive. he lord is our life. ♪ ♪ >> our next speaker is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar association, and the christian product company. >> we must stand our ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am h
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
. canadian border to the southern plains. chicago getting a break at 85. 86 in detroit. 86 here in new york. >> virus may be to blame for killing more than 300 dolphins along the east coast. the worst of the deadly outbreak is now more than 25 years. the bottlenosed dolphins. 25 years since it's been this bad. the bottle nosed dolphins washing up on beaches since july 1st. from new york to north carolina. most dolphins were infected with a disease similar to the measles. marine experts say it could last until next spring. >> a 16-year-old boy who survived the first documented wolf attack in minnesota is recovering at home and doing fine. noah graham was on a church camping trip over the weekend when the gray wolf chomped down on his head and wouldn't let go. he freed himself by prying open the animal's jaws with his bare hands. the wolf was later captured by trappers and killed. it is being tested for rabies. >> it is too early to speculate as far as the condition or the causes with this animal. it is not characteristic of wolves to approach people. >> the teenager was left with puncture wo
at its factories. >> hyundai recalls 23k santa fe suvs; can lose power detroit - hyundai is recalling about 23,000 suvs in the u.s. and canada because an axle can fail, causing the car to lose power. the recall affects 2013 santa fe sport models with front-wheel-drive and 2.4- liter, four-cylinder engines. they were built between july 11, 2012 through march 12 of this year. hyundai says the right axle shaft can fail in rare cases. if that happens, the suvs can lose power or roll away if parked on a slope. the company says it's not aware of any crashes or injuries linked to the defect. owners are being notified by letter. dealers will replace the axle shaft free of charge >> chipotle considering change to allow antibiotics chipotle mexican grill is reviewing a change to start using beef that has been treated with antibiotics, but said no decision has yet been made on the matter. the denver-based chain stressed in a press release tuesday that its beef, chicken and pork continues to come from animals that are not given antibiotics or added hormones whenever possible. but it said it's con
-show everyone is talking about. >>> detroit's top police brass blushing big-time, with the department accidentally revealed about its women officers. you don't want to miss this. ♪ [ bottle ] okay, listen up! i'm here to get the lady of the house back on her feet. [ all gasp ] oj, veggies you're cool. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! 'cause i'm re-workin' the menu, keeping her healthy and you on your toes. [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. i see you, cupcake! uh-oh! [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. ensure®. nutrition in charge™. grrrrreat outdoors,number one and a great deal.ended brand. ahhh let's leave the deals to hotels.com. perfect! yep, and no angry bears. up to 30% off. only at hotels.com. jon: well "happening now," some of the biggest names in the republican party converging on boston. new jersey governor chris christie, former speaker of house, newt gingrich and republican national committee chairman reince priebus set to speak at the
's kickalicious. >> yes. >> look at who kicked last night in the preseason for the detroit lions. >> that's awesome. >> two field goals. 49 and 50 yards. and all because he was featured here on "play of the day." that's great. >> congratulations. >>> also, i'm going to hijack now my "play of the day" for a bo-fer. take a look. >> i think this is going to happen a lot. >> down the line. >> tell america you're a dodgers fan. >> and now they're after gonzalez. >> thank you. thank you. thank you. vin scully, thank you, los angeles dodgers. this game, by the way, as they swept the mets, ended about four hours ago. it went 12 innings. it was glorious when i woke up and watched it on the dvr this morning. >> we have a thing going here. >> we have a thing going here, george. 40 of 48 they've won. i can't remember the last loss. >> i think you need to do some field reporting. >> i think i do. i'm coming to you, l.a. m coming to you, l.a. we've just topped our quarter pounder with even more bold new taste. you love bacon. we added thick-cut, applewood bacon to our new quarter pounder blt. now more
of when they think of boston politics. >> what other races are you keeping an eye on? >> one is detroit. field ofthis candidates narrowed in a runoff to just two contenders for a job which is very important right now. the election itself may be less important compared to what happens after the election. how much power the mayor will even have when there is an emergency manager with sweeping authority. there is also houston. a democratic mayor is running a republicanerm opponent. she was elected mayor of houston, it became the largest american city with an openly gay mayor. you wouldy necessarily stereotype houston, texas. texas, it is worth keeping an eye on what happens there. if you cover politics and policy in this era of budget -- >> you cover politics and policy. what can mayor is expected from washington regarding infant -- regarding infrastructure, the nuts and bolts. >> you talk to mirrors over the country -- you talk to mi ayors and they are fed up with how little support they get from washington. certainty.ally no stimulusof ways, the that a lot of folks credit with helping gi
a disproportionate impact on young in this country. i came back from a gathering in detroit, young people who are retail, fast food workers, who are demanding the minimum wage be lept forward to catch up with inflation because it's fall een woefully behind. these young people they see themselves as having absolutely nothing to lose in this economy. they're barely hanging on to the edge, working for $7.25. at rooms like rainbow, black, latino, white, asian, i'm sure there were native people in the room as well. the reality is they saw themselves as being on the same team. that team is people who in this economy, despite their brilliance, despite clear leadership potential h been relegated to margin and forced to survive on $7.25, which is something you can't do. i do believe this rising generation, more some than others because they're less tripped up on race, are willing to work together based on the common interest of kitchen table issues. you're seeing it with older people, too. we saw it with white union workers in 2012 throughout the midwest, for instance. so, i think there's reasons to b
the world's largest airline. >>> big-time bust for a police commander in detroit because he accidentally left the bra sizes of female officers out. the information was on a spread sheet for bullet-proof vest owners and got forwarded to others in the department. >> it is an embarrassing situation. i'm going to be addressing the situation formally with him over the next few weeks. >> will he face discipline for that? >> once we complete our investigation there will be corrective action. >>gretchen: the female officers will be filing grievances. screaming girls can't keep these dads from catching up on sleep. check out those photos of dads dozing off at the one direction concert. >>brian: the direction they want to head is home. they have had it. let the kids go. >>gretchen: one direction is home. they've got to keep a watchful eye on those girls. you never know. >>brian: what good are they doing if they're not even looking at the concert with their kids? go home. meet them on the outside. meet them in the parking lot. >>gretchen: is there a voice somewhere that's nearby? there he is. he's
detroit, michigan, which is where i live now, but she knew and i knew from reading different publications like "jet." our black newspaper was then called "the michigan chronicle." i remember vividly seeing the picture of mr. evers after he had been killed. but growing up in the north, in detroit, i lived the dream that dr. king spoke of. i went to integrated schools. i lived in an integrated neighborhood. my friends were both white and black, all through school. it disturbed my mother and it disturbs me that people in the south had problems, they could not live the life that i lived. we dined at lunch counters and took public transportation in contrast to what you heard about rosa parks and others. we rode on the bus -- it was called the dsr then. and we would ride wherever we wanted to go and sit wherever we wanted to sit. coming to the march for us meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. and not just my mother and i, obviously. 250,000 people felt the same way. those that could get there. there were many who watched from their tv's at home that felt the same wa
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
with it then. time for the rock block, first up michaela. >> let's look in the papers, from "the detroit press" a 49-year-old swimmer jim dreyer, 22 miles in 51 hours dragging a ton of bricks the whole way. he did it to raise money for habitat for humanity. >>> smartphones don't make your baby smart. the campaign for a ecommercial free childhood. >>> and parents stalking their kids at summer camp using the interweb. most have daily photos posted on their websites and said parents are looking at those closely. you wouldn't do that, alison? >> i do look closely at the pictures. new signs that greece is still struggling. we learned about an hour ago unemployment in greece hit a record high 27.6%, despite that stock futures in the u.s. are up slightly. >>> are you going to jail? upgrade to a nicer one for $155 a day. fremont, california, is allowing nonviolent offenders to do that. you can get a standard cell but the jail is smaller and quieter. it will help boost california's revenue. >>> more changes at yahoo! the company is changing its logo, leading up to the big reveal september 5th, yahoo! w
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